Thursday, 12 April 2012

Examples Of Communication ?

Examples of Communication 

1. Human speech 

Speech is a natural form of communication for human beings, and computers with the ability to understand speech and speak with a human voice are expected to contribute to the development of more natural man-machine interfaces. Computers with this kind of ability are gradually becoming a reality, through the evolution of speech synthesis and speech recognition technologies. However, in order to give them functions that are even closer to those of human beings, we must learn more about the mechanisms by which speech is produced and perceived, and develop speech information processing technologies that make use of these functions. We use speech every day almost unconsciously, but an understanding of the mechanisms on which it is based will help to clarify how the brain processes information and will also lead to the development of more human-like speech devices through the imitation of these functions by computers. 

2. Body Language

Body Language - technically known as kinesics (pronounced 'kineesicks') - is a significant aspect of modern communications and relationships.
Body Language is therefore very relevant to management and leadership, and to all aspects of work and business where communications can be seen and physically observed among people.
Body language is also very relevant to relationships outside of work, for example in dating and mating, and in families and parenting.
Communication includes listening. In terms of observable body language, non-verbal (non-spoken) signals are being exchanged whether these signals are accompanied by spoken words or not.
Body language goes both ways:
  • Your own body language reveals your feelings and meanings to others.
  • Other people's body language reveals their feelings and meanings to you.
The sending and receiving of body language signals happens on conscious and unconscious levels.
                                                                         3. Gesture
Gestures are a form of nonverbal communication in which visible bodily actions are used to communicate important messages, either in place of speech or together and in parallel with spoken words. Gestures include movement of the hands, face, or other parts of the body. Physical non-verbal communication such as purely expressive displays, proxemics, or displays of joint attention differ from gestures, which communicate specific messages.Gestures are culture-specific and can convey very different meanings in different social or cultural settings.Gesture is distinct from sign language. Although some gestures, such as the ubiquitous act of pointing, differ little from one place to another, most gestures do not have invariable or universal meanings but connote specific meanings in particular cultures. A single emblematic gesture can have very different significance in different cultural contexts, ranging from complimentary to highly offensive.
                                                                           4. Sign
A sign is understood as a discrete unit of meaning in semiotics. It is defined as "something that stands for something, to someone in some capacity" It includes words, images, gestures, scents, tastes, textures, sounds – essentially all of the ways in which information can be communicated as a message by any sentient, reasoning mind to another. The nature of signs has long been discussed in philosophy. Initially, within linguistics and later semiotics, there were two general schools of thought: those who proposed that signs are ‘dyadic’ (i.e. having two parts), and those who proposed that signs are interpreted in a recursive pattern of triadic (i.e. three-part) relationships.

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